Latin antecedents of French causative faire
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Latin antecedents of French causative faire

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Published by P. Lang in New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • French language -- To 1500 -- Causative,
  • Faire (The French word),
  • French language -- Foreign elements -- Latin,
  • Latin language -- Influence on French,
  • Romance languages -- Causative

Book details:

Edition Notes

Bibliography: p. [177]-181.

StatementJeffrey T. Chamberlain.
SeriesAmerican university studies., vol. 2
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPC2872 .C43 1986
The Physical Object
Paginationx, 181 p. ;
Number of Pages181
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2717280M
ISBN 100820402583
LC Control Number86010454

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Chamberlain, jeffrey t. Latin Antecedents of French Causative "Faire". American University Studies, Series Linguistics, 2. New York: Peter Lang, Pp. xi, There is no doubt that the French causative expressed by faire and a following infinitive poses a variety of descriptive and explanatory problems. Unlike. This study centers on three areas of investigation concerning the French causative construction faire faire quelque chose a quelqu'un: (1) the evolution of the Latin causative structure from the ut-sentential to the accusativus-cum-infinitivo; (2) the presence of the dative semantic agent of the infinitive in both the Latin and the French Author: Jeffrey Thomas Chamberlain. Abstract. (Ph.D.)--University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, This study centers on three areas of investigation concerning the French causative construction faire faire quelque chose a quelqu'un: (1) the evolution of the Latin causative structure from the ut-sentential to the accusativus-cum-infinitivo; (2) the presence of the dative semantic agent of the infinitive in both Author: Jeffrey Thomas Chamberlain.   A causative sentence must have a subject (a person or thing), a conjugated form of the verb faire and the infinitive of another verb, as well as at least one of these two things: a "receiver" (a person or thing being acted upon) and an "agent" (a person or thing being made to act).

for French faire-infinitif causatives of transitive verbs. To explain the delay, the Universal Freezing Hypothesis (UFH) of Snyder and Hyams () is extended to this type of causative: a. The causative may be called le causatif, la construction causative, la situation causative, or la structure causative in French, and is equivalent to "make something happen" or "have something done." Constructing the causative. The French causative is formed with three to four components: Faire conjugated according to the subject.   This is the French equivalent to having something done or to make someone do something. To form it, the construction is *faire + infinitive* The teacher has the students talk. - Le professeur fait parler les étudiants. He's having a house built. - Il fait construire une maison. This is pretty basic good grammar. When. The one that becomes the second object is always the object of faire — what you call the agent — it is certainly not called the agent in French since the faire + infinitive is in the ACTIVE voice. Je fais laver la voiture à Luc. I am getting Luc to wash the car or I am having the car washed by Luc.

The reflexive causative uses a reflexive pronoun to indicate that the subject is acted upon, whether this action is by his choice or not. It’s equivalent to "get/have something done to/for oneself." Constructing the reflexive causative. The French reflexive causative is formed with two or three components: Se faire conjugated according to the. CiteSeerX - Document Details (Isaac Councill, Lee Giles, Pradeep Teregowda): It is well known that the French causative verb faire assigns differential case to its ‘causee ’ argument: given an intransitive infinitive as complement, it assigns accusative case; given a transitive infinitive, it assigns dative case (i.e. the causee is à-marked): (1) a. coverage of French beyond that of Bratt’s analysis. Our goal here is to show that broad coverage need not come at the expense of linguistically significant generalizations. 1 Introduction The composition causative The verb faire is the canonical French causative, exemplified by the follow ing sen-. In causative constructions the verb faire may be conjugated in any tense, for example the periphrastic future (futur proche) or the passé composé (Tex va faire réparer sa voiture. Tex a fait réparer sa voiture. etc.) objects in causative faire constructions The causative faire construction is often followed by noun or pronoun objects.